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Election Day: What You Need to Know

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May 15, is election day in Hopkinton. Polls are open from 7:00 AM to 8:00 PM and the will be held in the Middle School gym at 88 Hayden Rowe Street. In most cases registered voters do not need to show ID to vote.

 A sample ballot is here.

There is only one contested race in this election and it is for School Committee. There are three candidates vying for two seats; Susan Stephenson (Democrat), Adam Munroe (Democrat) and Ashley Fogg (Unenrolled). You can learn more about each candidate by watching the debate hosted by HCAM and HopNews. You may also wish to review candidate statements from Susan Stephenson and Adam Munroe, and Ashley Fogg’s op-ed on bullying. There were many spirited comments.

Also on the ballot but running unopposed are:

CandidatePositionLength of TermParty
Amy RitterbuschSelect Board3 yearsDemocrat
Adam MunroeBoard of Assessors3 yearsDemocrat
Nasiba MannanBoard of Health3 yearsDemocrat
Jessica McCaffreyBoard of Library
Trustees
3 yearsDemocrat
Warren CarterBoard of Library
Trustees
3 yearsDemocrat
Mary DugganCommissioners of
Trust Funds
3 yearsDemocrat
John CardilloConstable3 yearsDemocrat
Ilana CassadyHousing Authority1 yearDemocrat
Laura HansonCommissioners of Parks
and Recreation
3 yearsDemocrat
Ravi DasariCommissioners of Parks
and Recreation
3 yearsDemocrat
Michael KingPlanning Board5 yearsDemocrat
Matthew WronkaPlanning Board5 yearsDemocrat
Vikasith PrattyPlanning Board3 yearsUnenrolled
Navdeep AroraPlanning Board2 yearsUnenrolled

In addition to candidate selection, there are six ballot questions voters will weigh in on, and they all have to with the same issue. Proposition 2 ½ refers to a Massachusetts law enacted in 1980 that places strict limits on the amount of property tax revenue a community can raise through real and personal property taxes. This revenue is called the Tax Levy, or just Levy. Proposition 2 ½ limits how much the levy can be increased from year-to-year.

At Town Meeting, voters approved several articles that require the town to borrow money to fund. The town is asking voters to approve a temporary exemption to Proposition 2 ½ so the funds can be raised. 

Question 1

Shall the Town of Hopkinton be allowed to exempt from the provisions of proposition two and one-half, so-called, the amounts required to pay for the bond issued in order to pay for the design, engineering, permitting, and construction of a new sidewalk on Chestnut St. from Wild Road to Smith Road, including any and all costs, fees, and expenses related to the same?

This is related to the Town Meeting article that approved sidewalk construction on Chestnut Street. Voters approved a sum of $514,250 to build them, contingent on the town borrowing the money to cover it. Approving this would add $9 per year to the tax bill for the average Hopkinton house valued at $753,300.

Question 2

Shall the Town of Hopkinton be allowed to exempt from the provisions of proposition two and one-half, so-called, the amounts required to pay for the bond issued in order to pay for the design, engineering, permitting, and construction of a new sidewalk between EMC Park and Fitch Avenue, connecting to Blueberry Lane, including any and all costs, fees, and expenses related to the same?

Same as above. A Yes vote will allow the town to to borrow the $187,000 necessary for the sidewalk construction approved at Town Meeting. This will add $3 per year to the tax bill for the average Hopkinton house valued at $753,300.

Question 3

Shall the Town of Hopkinton be allowed to exempt from the provisions of proposition two and one-half, so-called, the amounts required to pay for the bond issued in order to pay architectural and engineering design for Fire Station 2?

At Town Meeting, voters approved $70,000 for an engineering plan to refurbish the Woodville Fire Station, which is in disrepair. A Yes vote will add $3 per year to the tax bill for the average Hopkinton house valued at $753,300.

Question 4

Shall the Town of Hopkinton be allowed to exempt from the provisions of proposition two and one-half, so-called, the amounts required to pay for the bond issued in order to pay for Hopkinton Public School HVAC renewal work?

At Town Meeting, voters approved replacing the HVAC systems at the schools, which have reached end of life. The town needs $1,506,259 to complete this work, and a Yes vote will add $31 per year to the tax bill for the average Hopkinton house valued at $753,300.

Question 5

Shall the Town of Hopkinton be allowed to exempt from the provisions of proposition two and one-half, so-called, the amounts required to pay for the bond issued in order to pay for the Hopkins School Addition project?

At Town Meeting, voters agreed to fund additions to the Hopkins school at a price of $3,000,000 contingent on the town borrowing $800,000 and the rest coming from the School Stabilization Fund. A Yes vote will add $9 per year to the tax bill for the average Hopkinton house valued at $753,300.

Question 6

Shall the Town of Hopkinton be allowed to exempt from the provisions of proposition two and one-half, so-called, the amounts required to pay for the bond issued in order to pay for reconstruction and paving of Pratt Way and the roadways within Evergreen and Mount Auburn Cemeteries?

Voters at Town Meeting approved new pavement for the cemeteries and Pratt Way, commonly known as the entrance to the Fruit Street Athletic Complex. The cost to complete these projects is $480,000, all of which will be borrowed. A Yes vote will add $8 per year to the tax bill for the average Hopkinton house valued at $753,300.


If all questions are approved, the tax bill for the average Hopkinton house will increase $63 per year.

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